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There are lots of ways to celebrate Independence Day on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Here are a few.

9:00 a.m.

For you early risers who want to beat the heat, there’s the 55th annual Naturalization Ceremony at Monticello. This year’s speaker is David N. Saperstein.

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11:00 a.m.

James Monroe’s Highland will have family-friendly activities as well as a classical music ensemble performing from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

12:00 p.m.

Keswick Vineyards is celebrating with Reds, Whites, and Bluegrass—you guessed it, a selection of red and white wines paired with live local music, plus three food vendor offerings.

4:30 p.m.

Carter Mountain Orchard will have a bicycle parade, hayrides, sack races, and water balloon toss. You can even stay late and view the town fireworks from atop the mountain.

5:00 p.m.

Patriotism in the Park, an annual Charlottesville celebration, includes a pie-eating contest and fireworks display at McIntire Park.

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Charlottesville and the surrounding counties are such a beautiful spot in the world to put down roots that our clients come from both near and far to see what central Virginia has to offer. Several of those traveling from afar are often accompanied by their favorite canine and have asked us to recommend pet-friendly accommodations. For your easy reference, we’ve compiled a list of charming local inns, B&Bs, and quality hotels that welcome you and your pets. So if you’re interested in Charlottesville real estate and decide to visit, we’ve got you and your canine companion covered. And, as a dog-friendly office, we’ve included photos here of the pups who so bravely let their owners leave the house every day to work at Gayle Harvey Real Estate in order to bring home the bacon (literally). Enjoy!

Beamer & Bentli

Beamer & Bentli

Inns, Resorts, and B&Bs

Boar’s Head Resort

200 Ednam Drive | Charlottesville, VA | 855-452-2295

With 175 rooms, the Boar’s Head Resort has ample space for your canine companion, though there is a size restriction at 50 pounds. Dogs are only allowed alone in the room if crated.

Ellie Mae & Percy Miles

Ellie Mae & Percy Miles

Clifton Inn

1296 Clifton Inn Drive | Charlottesville, VA | 434-971-1800

This 17-room inn just beyond Pantops is a nice little getaway outside the bustle of Charlottesville for you and your pet to relax. The pet fee is $75 per stay for pets.

The Ebenezer House Bed & Breakfast

122 Seville Road | Madison, VA | 877-514-2510

This 5 room, family friendly B&B allows dogs and will arrange for a pet-sitting service (for a fee) while you are out taking in the sights.

Dixie

Dixie

The Inn at Sugar Hollow Farm

6051 Sugar Hollow Rd | Crozet, VA | 434-260-7234

This 10 room inn consists of two structures, The 1905 Farmhouse, which allows dogs, and The Main Inn, which does not. The pet fee is $20 per dog, per night, and dogs cannot be left unattended in your room. The inn sits on 70 acres that you and your dog can enjoy together.

Keswick Hall

701 Club Drive | Keswick, VA | 888-778-2565

Historic Keswick Hall happily admits the pets of its guests. The pet fee is $75 per pet, per stay, and pets are not allowed to be left alone in the room. Guest services can assist in scheduling pet sitting as needed.

The Mark Addy Inn

56 Rodes Farm Drive | Nellysford, VA | 434-361-1101

Out of 10 rooms, The Mark Addy Inn offers three pet-friendly rooms: Tiger Lily, Schloss, and Sundance. The pet fee is $25-50 per pet, per stay, depending on the weight of the pet.

Quince

Quince

Oakhurst Inn

100 Oakhurst Circle | Charlottesville, VA | 434-872-0100

Oakhurst Inn consists of 27 rooms, some of which are pet-friendly, right near the University. They ask that you call to arrange accommodations suitable for you and your pet.

 

Hotels

Omni Charlottesville

212 Ridge McIntire Road | Charlottesville, VA | 434-971-5500

The Omni Charlottesville Hotel located off the downtown mall allows pets weighing under 25 pounds. The pet fee is $100 per room.

Hyatt Place Charlottesville

2100 Bond Street | Charlottesville, VA | 434-995-5200

Conveniently located near the Shops at Stonefield, Hyatt Place has 137 guest rooms and allows up to 2 canine guests per room. Each dog must weigh no more than 50 pounds, and a combined weight no more than 75 pounds. The pet fee varies by the length of the stay.

Remy

Remy

Homewood Suites by Hilton Charlottesville

2036 India Road | Charlottesville, VA | 434-244-6200

Just off Route 29 North, Homewood Suites allows pets up to 75 pounds for a pet fee of $75.

Graduate Charlottesville

1309 W. Main Street | Charlottesville, VA | 434-295-4333

Located on “The Corner” near the University of Virginia, the Graduate hotel is near many restaurants and shops and is pet-friendly. The pet fee is $25 per night.

Doubletree by Hilton Charlottesville

990 Hilton Heights Road | Charlottesville, VA | 434-973-2121

The Doubletree by Hilton allows pets up to 75 pounds for a charge of $50.

Jake

Jake

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Life in Madison County

Madison County was founded in 1792 and named for the Madison family to which President James Madison (1751-1836) belonged. While President Madison’s home, Montpelier, is located in nearby Orange, his family owned land along the Rapidan River in the county named for them. Yet this is not the only presidential tie to the area. President Herbert Hoover at one time owned a home in Madison known as Rapidan Camp. The town of Madison still celebrates Hoover Day annually in August to mark his formal visit to the town in 1929. With such history, it is no surprise that some of the homes on the market in Madison date back to the 18th and 19th centuries. And despite its proximity to the ever-growing metropolis of Charlottesville, homes in Madison are often pleasantly situated on at least a few acres, allowing breathing room between neighbors. In addition, due to the topography of the area, many homes have mountain views. According to the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors (CAAR), in May 2017 the median estimated home value in Madison County was $186,800 while the median list price was $262,500, making it one of the more affordable counties surrounding Charlottesville. And with the Blue Ridge Mountains and Shenandoah National Park nearby, Madison County—just an hour and a half south of D.C.—is full of beauty and recreational opportunities.

Things To Do

Shenandoah National Park

Shenandoah National Park is made up of a 300-square-mile section of the breathtaking Blue Ridge Mountains. The park contains over 500 miles of hiking trails, including 101 miles of the Appalachian Trail. Stony Man and Hawksbill, the two highest elevation points, surpass 4,000 feet. The park is also the location of President Hoover’s Rapidan Camp where you can reserve a tour.11 PastoralAndMtnViews

Rapidan Wildlife Management Area

Adjacent to Shenandoah National Park and sharing a 25-mile boundary line is Rapidan Wildlife Management Area. It consists of 10,326 acres and the crossways of three rivers: Rapidan, Conway, and South River. Abundant fishing is available, including brook trout in the Rapidan and brown trout in the Conway. Please check for area regulations before fishing.

Roaring Twenties Antique Car Museum 1445 Wolftown Hood Road | Hood, VA 22723

This unique museum, open by appointment, has rows and rows of antique cars and memorabilia from the Jazz Age.

Early Mountain Vineyards 6109 Wolftown-Hood Road | Madison, VA 2272Early Mtn Vineyard 2Early Mtn Vineyard

Voted the #1 tasting room in the U.S. by USA Today readers in 2016, at Early Mountain Vineyards you can taste wine made from grapes grown in Virginia soil paired with cheese and charcuterie plates. There is also a full service restaurant and an overnight guest cottage at the vineyards.

DuCard Vineyards 40 Gibson Hollow Lane | Etlan, VA 22719

Unlike other local wines, DuCard wines are not available in stores and can only be purchased at the vineyard’s tasting room. It is a purposefully small operation, with small batch wine production, to maintain quality. The vineyard is also known for its sustainability initiatives, such as its solar-powered tasting room and support of the local food movement.

 Bald Top Brewing Co. 

This family-run brewery is located at the historic Woodbourne Estate (established circa 1810). Owners Dave Fulton and Julie Haines, along with two of their grown children and their families, run the brewery, which includes “Central Virginia’s largest private hops yard,” according to their website. Want to try locally brewed beer while also enjoying a beautiful, historic setting? This is the place to go.

Madison Arts Exchange

With over 200 local artists, the Madison Arts Exchange provides a central place to appreciate and support all of the visual arts talent that resides in Madison.

 

Dining

The Bavarian Chef

The Bavarian Chef has served German-inspired cuisine in Madison County since 1974. On their menu you’ll find pork and veal schnitzel along with filet mignon and Virginia trout. Reservations are recommended.

 

Our Madison listings

Madison County Retreat

Torthorwald Farm in the Hebron Valley

Graves Mill Farm

 

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Life in Keswick

Six miles east of Charlottesville you’ll find the unincorporated community of Keswick, an equestrian dream of green fields and rolling pastures. (Click here to learn more about the origins of the unique name). According to the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors’ (CAAR) Neighborhood Report, in February 2017 the median estimated home value in Keswick was $574,000 and the median list price was $590,000. In 2008, Stephen Wells of the New York Times wrote, “It’s this image of upscale rural America that best defines Keswick and its surrounding communities.” And this remains true today.

Here are some other things to know about life in Keswick.

Neighborhoods

Glenmore is a gated community with luxury homes tucked among mature trees, and paved walking trails that parallel the roads. Formerly a horse farm estate known nationwide, Glenmore gives a nod to its roots via its on-site Equestrian Center. The residential community also features an 18-hole golf course, a fitness/swimming/tennis facility, soccer field, basketball court, and a clubhouse.

Glenmore Golf Club

Glenmore Golf Club

Just on the other side of I-64, you’ll find Keswick Estates, a small luxury residential community consisting of 121 homes and home building sites. Like Glenmore, it is gated, but home sites are larger at two to six acres. Its proximity to the Keswick Hall resort means that residents have easy access to all of the resort’s amenities, such as the golf club and spa.

Keswick Estates

Keswick Estates

Recreation

There are other recreational opportunities in Keswick beyond the Glenmore Country Club and Keswick Hall.

Keswick Vineyards is a lovely spot to enjoy a glass of wine along with views of the Southwest Mountains. In 2016 the American Wine Society awarded the vineyard the silver award for their 2015 Chardonnay Reserve.

Just a little bit further north is Castle Hill Cider, if you prefer apples to grapes, cider to wine. Another bucolic setting in which to relax, you’ll enjoy the sights and sounds surrounding Castle Hill. Be sure to try the Celestial cider.

A couple miles from Glenmore you can spend an afternoon antiquing at A&W CollecTables. You can read more about their offerings here.

If a private guided tour of the countryside is more your taste, and you enjoy the perspective gained from atop a horse, check out Indian Summer Guide Service. Tour options include guided horseback rides through several wineries and vineyards—including Keswick Vineyards—as well as the orchards of Castle Hill Cider.

Keswick Hall swimming pool

Keswick Hall swimming pool

Dining

Keswick Hall & Golf Club offers three dining options: Fossett’s, Villa Crawford, and Treble Wine Cellar. Fossett’s is committed to using locally sourced ingredients wherever possible for their gourmet American menu. Fossett’s also usually participates in Charlottesville Restaurant Week, a benefit for the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank held twice a year—in January and in July—that offers three-course meals at reduced rates. (The next Restaurant Week will be July 14-23, 2017.) Villa Crawford serves a lunch buffet as well as a la carte dining that includes comfort foods as well as healthy options. The Treble Wine Cellar is a private dining venue with the option of either ordering from the Fossett’s menu or enjoying the recommended pairings of the executive chef and sommelier.

Shortly before the turn off to Glenmore is the elegant Clifton Inn with award-winning dining. You’ll need to call ahead for reservations. We also recommend keeping a look out for special tastings and dining offerings.

For more Keswick data, you can find the complete, detailed Neighborhood Report here.

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Life in Crozet

Twelve miles west of Charlottesville you’ll find the quaint yet growing community of Crozet, a census-designated-place (CDP) in Albemarle County, nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains with an elevation of 837 feet. (Click here to learn more about the origins of the unique name). According to the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors (CAAR) Neighborhood Report (February 2017), the population in Crozet is growing. At the time of the 2010 census there were 5,565 documented residents. There are now 6,600. In our mild, four-season climate, Crozet enjoys 98 days of full sun per year, with an annual rainfall of 45 inches and annual snowfall of 19.88 inches. Average temperatures range from 20-45 degrees Fahrenheit in January and 65-85 in July. Most residents, CAAR reports, are age 35-54 and most households earn $75,000 – $100,000 annually. The majority of residents work in education and the average commute is 26 minutes. Data collected within the last six months shows that 76% of residents own their home and 24% rent. Most of the dwellings purchased in Crozet at the time of CAAR’s report had fewer than 1400 square feet, were constructed within the last 10-20 years, and had three to four bedrooms. The typical price per square foot was $175-200, or less than $300,000 for the total property. However, the median estimated home value was $369,000 and the median list price was $544,000.

Now that you have all of the data, here are some other things you should know about life in Crozet.

Developments

Old Trail Village

pexels-photo-61136This growing neighborhood development identifies itself as an “urban village,” defined as a mix of residential, dining, retail, and recreational buildings and structures, all contained within a walkable environment. The Old Trail Village Center has all of the above, including an ACAC Fitness and Wellness Center that offers classes, as well as cardio and strength training equipment. If you’re looking for outdoor activities, there are miles of walking and biking trails, a pool with Blue Ridge Mountain views at the Old Trail Swim Club, and an 18-hole championship golf course at the Old Trail Golf Club.

Foxchase Landing

This is another ongoing development in Crozet, located just off Route 250 West and nearby schools, restaurants, a grocery store, and the amenities of the Old Trail Village.

Piedmont Place

pexels-photo-12346Open since September 2016, Piedmont Place is a solar-powered multi-use building with several dining options, a yoga studio, a multi-vendor market that includes a bookstore and a local craft brew & wine shop, and residential apartments. It is located just across the street from the new library, something architect Bob Anderson took into account in designing the façade, which pays homage to the library’s exterior. Within the Piedmont Place Market, you’ll find healthy meals to-go from Morsel Compass, small-batch, hand-crafted ice cream at Crozet Creamery, and nutritional smoothies and organic coffee at Smojo.

Local Dining

In the case of a couple Crozet restaurants, the old adage is true in the best sense: their reputations precede them. Even for newcomers to the Charlottesville area, it won’t be long before you hear of Fardowners Restaurant and Crozet Pizza. According to their website, the namesake of Fardowners is “a group of Irish immigrants who labored for the Blue Ridge Railway Co. and helped construct four tunnels through the Blue Ridge Mountains during the decade before the Civil War.” The restaurant sits near the railroad tracks that run through Crozet and is in sight of the old C&O railroad depot, which used to house the community library. As part of their mission is to support other local businesses, the Fardowners menu is as locally-sourced as possible. Their menu includes pub standards like burgers and wings, but also hefty salads and innovative twists on traditional mac & cheese. Their brunch menu includes Vegan and Vegetarian-friendly options, too, such as a tofu scramble sourced from Louisa County’s own Twin Oaks.

Family-owned Crozet Pizza has been serving fresh pizzas made from their own original recipes since 1977. (It’s so good it even made our Top 5 list of pizzerias in the Charlottesville area.) Their House Favorites include “Buddhist Pie” (white sauce, sun dried tomatoes, red peppers, feta, fresh basil), “Meet Me in Crozet” (pepperoni, sausage, meatballs), and “Maui” (bacon, ham, pineapple). You can also order custom pizzas as well as varieties of calzones, salads, and appetizers.

Smoked Kitchen & Tap at Piedmont Place offers slow smoked, hickory BBQ, as well as salads burgers, and sandwiches. And The Rooftop, just upstairs, is Crozet’s sky bar with gorgeous Blue Ridge Mountain views, cocktails, and a small plates menu that includes flatbread pizza.

View from the patio at Restoration.

View from the patio at Restoration.

If you’re looking for something more filling, there’s Restoration at Old Trail Village, which specializes in high-end comfort food. Menu items include croquet monsieur, pan seared salmon, and friend chicken & waffles, which comes with apple cider bacon gastrique and can be further upgraded by substituting duck confit for the fried chicken. In addition to the elegant interior, there is outdoor patio seating that overlooks the Old Trail Golf Club course.

Crozet Arts & Crafts Festival

Twice a year, in May and October, the Crozet Arts & Crafts Festival brings its lively and celebratory vibe to Claudius Crozet Park for a weekend of festivities. White tents dot the landscape while local singers and musicians perform, and the air fills with the aromas of foods as varied as kettle corn, funnel cake, fried onions, Thai noodles, and quesadillas.

The Crozet/Western Albemarle Library

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn September 2013, after years of being housed in the old depot, the Crozet/Western Albemarle Library opened the doors to its new, permanent home in downtown Crozet. It has a growing collection and space that allows for 75,000 volumes of books.

Mint Springs Valley Park

This 520-acre park includes four hiking trails, picnic areas and grills, 8 acres of water, and a one-acre beach. Swimming is allowed from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, except when county schools are in session. There is a small entry fee for both county residents and non-county residents, or season passes are available for purchase. As long as you have a fishing license, you will also be able to fish for the stocked trout, sunfish, channel catfish, and large-mouth bass.

For more Crozet data, you can find the complete, detailed Neighborhood Report here.

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Historic Garden Week

This month visitors and residents of Virginia will have the opportunity to visit over 250 gardens, homes, and landmarks during Historic Garden Week. This event, organized and operated by the Garden Club of Virginia, has been in existence since 1933! This year’s Historic Garden Week, which runs from April 22-27, 2017, consists of 30 distinct tours, including several in and around Charlottesville.

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Located just down the road from James Monroe’s Highland and Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, Morven (Scottish for “Great Mountain”) is an extensive estate of nearly 3,000 acres with a long history. Thomas Jefferson purchased 1,334 acres in 1795 and leased plots of land to local farmers. In 1813, he transferred ownership of the property to David Higginbotham, who gave it the name Morven and oversaw construction of the main house. The estate was owned by three more families before Charles and Mary Stone purchased it in 1926. By 1933, Mary Stone had revived the formal gardens and opened them to visitors for the first ever Virginia Garden Week. Morven has remained part of the Virginia Garden Week every year since. In 1988, businessman and philanthropist John W. Kluge purchased the Morven estate. During his ownership, Kluge ordered construction of a Japanese garden, which remains part of the garden tour. In 2001, Kluge donated over 7,000 acres of the estate to the University of Virginia Foundation, which now maintains it and uses it for educational purposes.

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The Albemarle County House and Garden Tour will consist of five properties: Southfield—20 acres of trees, shrubs, and perennials; Choill Mhor—meaning “Great Woods” in Gaelic, a manor house built in 2005 that sits on 50 acres with many native and non-native plants; Midway—an early 19th-century farmhouse with several hundred acres and a formal garden; The Laing House—a custom home built in 2007 with mountain and river views, surrounded by informal gardens; and Fox Ridge—a 280-acre equestrian farm that includes a 19th-century log cabin and boxwood gardens.

pexels-photo-27443At the University of Virginia, the Pavilion Gardens, Pavilion homes, and the president’s house, Carr’s Hill, will be part of the tour. On the only American university campus (or “grounds”) designated a World Heritage site, you can enjoy the historic serpentine walls and restored gardens. Carr’s Hill, built circa 1890, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Also on the tour is the Morea Garden on Sprigg Lane, which features a botanical collection.

pexels-photo-164260According to the Virginia Garden Week website, “Tour proceeds fund the restoration and preservation of more than 40 of Virginia’s historic public gardens and landscapes, a research fellowship program and a centennial project with Virginia State Parks.” These restoration projects include sites at the University of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello in Charlottesville, Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest in Lynchburg, James Madison’s Montpelier in Orange County, and Point of Honor—an antebellum plantation-turned-museum—in Lynchburg.

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It’s March, which means the annual Festival of the Book—now in its 23rd year—will soon be upon us here in Charlottesville. A great time to reflect on the literary culture of our little city. Even on non-festival days, our local bookstores become sites of great intellectual insights and imaginative explorations. Whether this occurs as a private exchange between a reader and an author via a printed book, between fellow readers, or during a reading and Q&A with an author in the flesh. The often modest bookshop storefront provides the doorway to an important cultural institution. And Charlottesville has several from which to choose.

On the Historic Downtown Mall

New Dominion Bookshop

404 E. Main Street | Charlottesville, VA 22902

New Dominion Bookshop

New Dominion Bookshop

New Dominion Bookshop’s claim to fame is that it is the “oldest independent bookseller in Virginia,” having been continuously in operation since 1924. The most recent owner, Carol Troxell, purchased the store in the mid-1980s and ran it until her sudden, unexpected death in January. (NPR did a lovely story on Carol and her bookshop, which you can listen to here.) The fate of the bookstore is as yet unknown, but let’s hope for the sake of the local literary community it will find a way to carry on without its late beloved owner. New Dominion Bookshop has a long history of hosting authors throughout the year, including during the annual Festival of the Book. It has also been known to employ authors as booksellers, such as novelist Emma Rathbone who authored The Patterns of Paper Monsters (Back Bay Books, 2010) and Losing It (Riverhead, 2016), and poet Kevin McFadden, author of the poetry collection Hardscrabble (University of Georgia Press, 2008). The shop is a deep and narrow gallery of tall shelves packed with new books, rarely any space between titles. Here you can find signed copies of the latest John Grisham novel, classic literature from the English canon, children’s books, and a well-stocked travel section. An island in the middle showcases new hardcovers and holds the one cash register, while a few floating book carts around the store showcase distinct categories, like local authors and Pulitzer Prize winners. A steep staircase toward the back of the store leads to the open second story where authors give readings and sign books. This floor also often serves as a rotating gallery of visual art by local artists.

Daedalus Bookshop

123 Fourth Street NE | Charlottesville, VA22902

Daedalus Bookshop

Daedalus Bookshop

Open since 1975, Daedalus Bookshop is the longest running used bookstore in Charlottesville. This unique shop just off the downtown mall is a three-story warren filled with, at last count, 120,000 used books meticulously organized and reasonably priced. Ask the owner, Sandy McAdams, about any title and he will likely know off the top of his head whether or not he has it, as well as descriptive details, such as the binding and whether or not it is signed by the author. This is the kind of bookstore you can browse in for hours, meandering through book-lined pathways and peeking into alcoves devoted to entire genres. As C-VILLE Weekly reported in 2015, McAdams moved from New York to Charlottesville in 1974 accompanied by “20,000 books in a railroad car” after purchasing the building at the corner of Market Street and Fourth Street NE.

Read It Again Sam 

214 E. Main Street | Charlottesville, VA 22902

A fixture on the mall since the mid-1980s, you’ll know it by the signature carts of used paperbacks outside. Inside, Read It Again Sam is a tidy shop with quality used books in great condition and clear designations by genre. If you’re interested in unloading some of your own home library, the owner, Dave Taylor, is almost always buying but you might want to call ahead and ask. You can either get cash for books or sign up for some store credit to feed your reading habit.

Read It Again Sam

Read It Again Sam

Blue Whale Books

115 W. Main Street | Charlottesville, VA 22902

Each of Charlottesville’s bookstores has its own distinct personality and defining characteristics. One of the things that makes Blue Whale Books distinct is the beautiful prints and antique maps they sell in addition to books. The other distinction is Gizmo: the Corgi who spends his time greeting customers with a friendly sniff and lounging in patches of sunlight. Blue Whale occasionally buys used books, but you will need to call ahead first to make sure they’re buying.

Blue Whale Books

Blue Whale Books

On the Corner

Heartwood Books

5 Elliewood Avenue | Charlottesville, VA 22903

If you’re looking for a charming bookshop in which to browse beautifully bound antique books and affordable paperbacks, Heartwood Books is the place to go—especially if you want to relive the college experience of seeking out used classics. Heartwood is located just off University Avenue on the Corner and the staff is knowledgeable and helpful.

UVA Bookstore

400 Emmet Street South | Charlottesville, VA 22904

Just across from Newcomb Hall and above the Emmet Street parking garage, the university bookstore is a spacious, modern store filled with rows of short shelves displaying the shiny spines of new books. You can find sections devoted to faculty and alumni authors, rows of notebooks and journals to write in, and, of course, lots of UVA memorabilia, too—including beautiful framed photographs of the Rotunda.

On Route 29

The Book Room

440 Twentyninth Place Court | Charlottesville, VA 22901

This shop, with its long rows of tall shelves, is tucked away in an unassuming strip mall called Charlottesville Shoppers World that contains big brand stores, such as Stein Mart, across from the Fashion Square Mall on Route 29. The Book Room sells used books at least 50% off the list price they would be sold at if new, and they have a sale every January. If you are interested in their inventory and also have some books to purge from your home library, they offer a trading service. But one of the best advantages here? Ample parking.

Bookstore 5

In Crozet

Over the Moon Bookstore & Artisan Gallery

2025 Library Avenue | Crozet, VA 22932

In this cozy shop run by two sisters, Anne and Laura DeVault, you will often find Anne sitting behind the counter, knowledgeable and ready to discuss your favorite books or make a suggestion. If you enter the store with a head full of more titles than you could possible buy, she will even start a wish list for you so that when someone comes in to shop for you, she can pass along the titles of the books you most desire. At certain times of year, she also offers advance reader copies free with the purchase of a book. (These are copies that the publisher sends to reviewers and booksellers in advance of a book’s official release date.) And, as the name suggests, this store also functions as a gallery for local artisans, adding to the already lovely aesthetic of a well-kept shop stocked with books waiting to be opened.

In Scottsville

Baine’s Books & Coffee

485 Valley Street | Scottsville, VA 24590

At Baine’s you can have your book with a side of espresso and quiche, or a pastry made in-house. They describe their small selection of new and used books as carefully “curated,” and frequently host book signings with local authors. Their current winter hours run daily until 4 pm. Check their website for updated hours.

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Start Planning Your Dream Vineyard

Virginia Wine aptly describes on their website the great potential of land in central Virginia for farming wine grapes: “The eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge and the rolling countryside to the east offer excellent topography, fertile granite-based clay soil and a growing season of over 200 days.” Their site includes a compiled list of 72 vineyards and wineries in the central Virginia area alone. Yet there is still ample open land for sale in central Virginia ripe with possibilities for the next great vineyard. Compared with Napa Valley’s 500+ wineries in 748 square miles, central Virginia still has room to grow (Albemarle County alone is 726 square miles). Luckily for you, the discerning buyer or investor, the Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) has just released a Vineyard Financial Calculator, an invaluable tool when considering such a land purchase and business venture. As the VCE writes, “This tool’s intended user is an individual or organization exploring the financial requirements of vineyard establishment and operation in Virginia.” This financial calculator was created by Tremain Hatch, Peter Callan, and Tony Wolf.

Vineyard 2

The Calculator tab contained within the Excel spreadsheet prompts the user to input information specific to their proposed operation, such as the number of acres that will support the vines, the width of the rows of vines, the crop produced per foot, the hours of labor per acre, and the cost of capital. The formulas already figured into the spreadsheet will then calculate your cash flow. The “Trellis” tab allows you to figure in the cost of installing a trellis, as well as a fence to protect your vines from hungry wildlife, such as the deer population. The “Equipment” tab includes a very informative table complete with the name, type, and price of equipment typically needed to operate a vineyard. Simply consider the kind of equipment you’ll need for the size and type of vineyard you want to have, then enter the relevant numbers in the prepared calculator. You will also need to consult the “hours of use” graph at the bottom of the page, which helps calculate the life of your equipment based on your desired acreage. The embedded formulas will then calculate both your capital expenditures for equipment and your annual fixed cost for equipment based on industry standards.

Finally, once you’ve entered all of the information specific to your dream vineyard, your diligent and attentive work pays off in the Budget, Net Present Value, and Sensitivity Analysis tabs. The Budget includes fields already linked to figures you have entered in other tabs and calculates your revenue and cash flow. The Net Present Value tab looks into the future and calculates when you would begin to see a profit. And the Sensitivity Analysis tab illustrates how your profit might vary based on fluctuations in crop yield and price.

Vineyard 3

If you’ve long dreamed of owning a vineyard in central Virginia, now you have the means to begin seriously thinking about logistics. And when you’re ready to see land in which to plant those first few seeds of your dream, contact Gayle Harvey Real Estate and we’ll be happy to help.

To learn more about what is entailed in establishing a winery in central Virginia, read our blog post here. For information on business license requirements in central Virginia, click here.

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The entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in central Virginia. The City of Charlottesville—ranked #4 on ValuePenguin’s Best Cities for Small Business and on Livability.com’s 50 Best Cities for Entrepreneurs—is home to both the annual Tom Tom Founders Festival, which celebrates and rewards innovation, and the Community Investment Collaborative, which supports small businesses.

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If you are a business owner and are perusing real estate in central Virginia, you may be interested to know the business license requirements and fees according to the different counties. Whether you already live in central Virginia and are interested in relocating or expanding your business in another county, or whether you are exploring business opportunities in central Virginia for the first time, we have pulled together some information to help you compare and contrast the requirements among the counties. (Please note that most central Virginia counties that require businesses to have a license set a March 1 deadline for application or renewal.)

Albemarle

Before acquiring a business license in Albemarle County, you will first need to register the business name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, find out whether your type of business (partnership, LLC, etc.) is required to register with the Virginia State Corporation Commission, and acquire zoning clearance from the Community Development Department. Albemarle County requires that businesses renew their license every year by March 1. For businesses with gross receipts between $5,000 and $100,000, the license fee is $50. For businesses with gross receipts of $100,000 or more, business owners will need to calculate the fee based on figures detailed on the business license application.

Augusta

In order to obtain an Augusta County business license, you first need to apply for a zoning certificate and register the name of your company with the Community Development office. All businesses must renew their license each year by March 1.

Greene

In Greene County, you must apply for a business license from the Commissioner of Revenue. The license fee is based on both gross receipts and your type of business (retail, contracting, etc.), and you must renew your license every year by March 1.DeathtoStock_Creative Community7

Louisa

Louisa County does not require a business license for any business to operate within the county unless you are a contractor. In order to obtain a Contractor’s License in Louisa, the contractor must first be licensed in the state of Virginia. The fee for the Louisa County Contractor’s License is based on gross receipts of the previous year.

Nelson

Nelson County requires businesses to apply for and annually renew their business license with the Commissioner of the Revenue’s office by March 1.

The following central Virginia counties do not have a business license requirement:

Fluvanna

Orange

Madison

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Coffeehouses of Charlottesville

In our fast-paced, multicultural society, few things bring people together like the local coffee shop. This modest cultural institution has become a hallmark of thriving urban neighborhoods, and countless anecdotal evidence suggests that it helps cultivate a sense of community. The coffee shops in beautiful and innovative Charlottesville are no exception, and there is a vast array from which to choose, whether you prioritize taste, location, or sustainably sourced beans.

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When Shenandoah Joe first opened in 1993, it was not as a coffee house but rather a warehouse where customers could buy bags of beans roasted in small batches. In the summers they sold fresh coffee at the City Market, continuing to draw a following, and began serving shots of espresso in their warehouse. Finally, in 2007, they moved out of the warehouse and established the Preston Avenue Espresso Bar and Roastery, eventually opening the Ivy Coffee Bar and Corner Joe locations as well. Each location has a distinct atmosphere, while all serving up the same high-quality coffee. Preston Avenue is relaxed and comfortable with a couch, armchairs, communal table, and bar. The music is usually louder at Ivy Road where there are booths and indoor and outdoor tables. It’s noticeably quieter at Corner Joe where students sit behind laptops, earbuds in their ears, their eyes downcast in fixed concentration.

Mudhouse

Local roaster and coffee shop Mudhouse was just named 2017 Micro Roaster of the Year by Roast Magazine! Founded by power duo Lynelle and John Lawrence, Mudhouse began as a coffee cart on the downtown mall and has been a Charlottesville staple for the last 20 years. It now boasts two brick and mortar locations: one on the Charlottesville pedestrian mall across from the Violet Crown movie theater, and the other in downtown Crozet. You can also find Mudhouse coffee bars at Bellair and Mill Creek Markets, convenient when refueling your car or grabbing a sandwich to go. Wherever you find Mudhouse coffee, their mission is the same: to provide high caliber coffee that is responsibly and sustainably sourced from small farms all over the world. The downtown Charlottesville location has limited indoor seating but is a lovely place to sit outside during the warmer months, while the Crozet location is more spacious. And if you’re looking for an extra dose of energy other than the caffeine in your coffee, try one of their healthy and delicious power balls made on site with honey and peanut butter and other yummy goodness.

Java Java

The inviting and cheerful yellow storefront of Java Java is hard to miss near the east end of Charlottesville’s downtown mall. A display case of croissants, bagels, and delicious baklava greets you at the counter as you enter. It is often a quiet place to take a beat and reflect while instrumental music plays softly through the speakers, and passersby bustle past the large front window. An alcove with armchairs invites seclusion while a loveseat and many tables both inside and outside invite companionship and conversation. Java Java’s Chai latte is one of the most flavorful and economic choices Charlottesville has to offer, and service is usually courteous and fast.

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C’ville Coffee

C’ville Coffee has many advantages over other local coffee shops. Located in McIntire Plaza, it is very close to downtown and yet has a parking lot as well as on-street parking. The interior is spacious with large, round tables that aren’t too close together if you’re looking for a place to have a private conversation without being at your neighbor’s elbow. It has a play space for children as well as a “kid-free zone” where adults work at their laptops and groups sometimes meet for discussion. A substantial breakfast and lunch menu offers eggs, wraps, sandwiches, and generous salads. Hours extend to 8 pm on weeknights and weekly evening performances offer music or improvisational comedy for entertainment.

Milli Coffee Roasters

Having opened its doors in 2012, Milli Coffee Roasters is one of the relative newcomers on the Charlottesville coffee scene. Owner and manager Nick Leichentritt studied the art of making coffee at the American Barista Coffee School in Portland, Oregon. He returned to Charlottesville with the goal of elevating the role of barista to craftsman, and founded Milli with a preference for personal touch and attention over automation. To this end, Milli roasts their own beans in small batches in-house. They also offer substantial menu items such as waffles and paninis. Open until 9 pm most nights, Milli may be your best bet for evening coffee in Charlottesville. They host occasional readings, art shows, and comedy shows, and have ample indoor and outdoor seating, not to mention parking.

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Calvino Italian Bar and Eatery

In the part of Charlottesville known as Midtown (West Main Street), tucked into a corner of the Main Street Market sits Calvino. Named after the renowned Italian writer Italo Calvino, this eatery is modeled after Italian style cafes and was established by Ken Wooten and Charles Roumeliotes, the same chefs that own and operate Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar. Calvino serves Shenandoah Joe coffee, as well as smoothies and Italian sandwiches. Whatever menu item you select, you can trust that if it was conceived by the masterminds behind Orzo, it will be beautifully presented and taste delicious.

Greenberry’s

Like Mudhouse, Greenberry’s is also the brainchild of a couple: Sean and Roxanne Simmons. You wouldn’t know it from the looks of their modest and cozy shop at Barracks Road Shopping Center, but since first opening this flagship store in 1992, Greenberry’s has expanded with multiple franchises throughout Virginia, as well as in Maryland, Louisiana, Japan, and Saudi Arabia. While the Barracks Road location has somewhat limited seating, it is a pleasant shop that has the advantage of the extensive shopping center parking. The savory menu includes wraps and breakfast sandwiches, and the display case of baked goods includes gluten-free options. This location often serves as a gathering place for local business people, students and professors, as well as local running groups post-workout.

Grit Coffee

Local franchise Grit Coffee currently has four locations: downtown in York Place, Elliewood Avenue on the Corner, in the Shops at Stonefield, and in Crozet. Founded on the mission of “thoughtful hospitality,” Grit Coffee has not only coffee and espresso, but also breakfast, lunch, wine, and beer. The full downtown menu includes eggs, “Grit Bowls,” waffles, sandwiches and salads. While smaller, the Crozet menu also offers select breakfast sandwiches, quiche, and lunch items. The Corner location is a great spot to grab a coffee and cookie while exploring University grounds and the shops nearby, and has a lovely row of outdoor tables for basking in sunshine.

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Atlas Coffee

If a hole in the wall is more to your taste, Atlas Coffee is the place for you. Located in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood at the intersection of Fontaine and Jefferson Park Avenue, Atlas Coffee occupies a small storefront beside Guadalajara’s. While inside there is a small bar for sitting and sipping your coffee, outside there are patio tables with bright umbrellas. Atlas Coffee sells coffee roasted by Shenandoah Joe, pastries baked by Albemarle Baking Company and Carpe Donut, as well as tacos to-go made by Brazos Tacos.

MarieBette Café & Bakery

MarieBette offers everything you could wish for in a café, while also crafting the most delectable breads and pastries in-house that you can imagine. Another Charlottesville power couple is the creative impetus and rock foundation of this institution: Jason Becton and Patrick Evans, who met at the International Culinary Center. (The name MarieBette comes from the combination of their two daughters’ names.) They serve coffee roasted by La Colombe, one of the biggest independent coffee roasters in the United States. And while their coffee may not be roasted locally, their café and dining menu draw heavily from the seasons and farms in Central Virginia with an emphasis on fresh, local ingredients. In their dining room, you can enjoy breakfast dishes such as croquet monsieur and baked eggs served in a cast-iron skillet, as well as lunch items. In the bakery, be sure to try the combined chocolate-almond croissant to get the best of both worlds, as well as the canelé for a flavorful treat.

Paradox Pastry

The paradox implicit in this café/bakery’s name is the fact that owner Jenny Peterson is a personal trainer in addition to being a baker. After studying at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, she moved to Charlottesville and worked to help others achieve their fitness goals at ACAC while continuing to bake in her home. She opened Paradox Pastry in 2012 in the beautiful Glass Building downtown, where it has remained the site of her culinary guilty pleasures. The prominent display case frequently features fruit tarts, quiche, butter croissants, and huge cookies—often with a gluten-free option. Don’t let the narrow storefront fool you. There is a second floor with more seating tucked away, and on temperate days the front windows are flung open, making for a very pleasant dining experience.

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